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How Do I Clean a Golf Glove?

by Katie Rosehill
    Clean gloves translate to a better grip, more comfort and a longer club grip life.

    Clean gloves translate to a better grip, more comfort and a longer club grip life.

    Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images

    The purpose of a golf glove is to help the golfer achieve a firmer grip, because sweaty hands make holding the club more difficult. But the inside of the glove accumulates a buildup of sweat, skin oil and salt. Dirty gloves become slicker and interfere with a golfer's grasp. Leather golf gloves are washable, according to Vivien Saunders, author of "The Golf Handbook for Women."

    Items you will need

    • Gentle soap
    • Warm water
    • Terrycloth towel

    Step 1

    Brush debris off the gloves. Pre-treat dirty spots by gently rubbing with a mild liquid soap. Use your fingers or a sponge. If the stain is stubborn, scrub with a baby's toothbrush.

    Step 2

    Fill the sink with warm soapy water. Swish the glove in the water, and then force the water through the fingers. Pay careful attention to the palm of the glove. Put the glove on your hand, and then wash your hands with a scrubbing motion in the soapy water. Be gentle. Leather is tough, but it will rip if you treat it harshly.

    Step 3

    Rinse thoroughly, filling the inside of the glove with water several times.

    Step 4

    Put the glove on a terrycloth towel. Fold the ends of the towel over the glove and press firmly to remove excess water.

    Step 5

    Pull the fingers out to the glove's normal shape. Lay the glove flat to dry, away from heat. Before the glove is completely dry, put it back on. Pull each finger down, and flex your hand to stretch the leather back into shape and soften it.

    Tips

    • Do not put the glove in the dryer or expose it to harsh detergents.
    • Alternate two or three gloves when you play.
    • If your glove consistently gets dirty in one particular spot, check your grip.

    Warnings

    • Do not use heat to dry the glove. It will become stiff and brittle.

    References

    About the Author

    Katie Rosehill's first book was published in 2000. Since then she has written additional books as well as screenplays, website content and e-books. Rosehill holds a Master of Business Administration from Arizona State University. Her articles specialize in business and personal finance. Her passion includes cooking, eating and writing about food.

    Photo Credits

    • Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images