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Golf Club Components

by Marc Jenkins
    The components of a golf club include a shaft, ferrule, grip, hosel and clubhead.

    The components of a golf club include a shaft, ferrule, grip, hosel and clubhead.

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    Overview

    Everything in life has many different things, pieces or components which make up the individual article or the total item. This is definitely the case when it comes to the makeup of the golf club. This most essential piece of golfing equipment is constructed of five different components that all come together to create what is needed on the course.

    The Shaft

    The shaft is a tapered tube of metal, which represents most of the club that is made of either steel or graphite. Most golf club shafts are about 1/2 inch or 12 millimeters in diameter, 35 to 48 inches in length and located near the grip of the club. Considered by many golfers as the engine of the club, the shaft comes in a variety of flex selections so that it can be matched with a player’s game. There are X (Extra Stiff), S (Stiff), R (Regular), A (Soft Regular) and L (Lady) flexes which are the most common of them all. The flexes come into play with player preference and average swing speed of the golfer. If a golfer feels the need to switch shafts on a club it can be done so they can have complete comfort while on the course. To replace a shaft on a club in 2009, it can run you anywhere from $20 to $1500.

    The Grip

    The grip is the section of a golf club which is located at the very top that is held onto by a golfer while swinging the club. The grip is made of very comfortable rubber-like materials which allow the user to gain an optimal feel on the golf club. All grips with the exception of those found on putters must have a circular cross-section, while the putter is allowed to have any cross section that is symmetrical throughout the length of the grip. There are a range of different grips which a golfer can use, everything from thick to thin based on the golfers preference but aren’t allowed to have extra bulges. The grip is also something on the club that can be replaced; it is much cheaper than replacing a shaft and you can even do it yourself.

    The Hosel

    The Hosel is the part where the clubhead and shaft on a golf club attach to one another. The Hosel design is extremely important to the balance, feel and power which a golfer receives from that particular club. The Hosel is constructed with as little mass as possible on the top of the striking face of the golf club; this allows the golfer to receive a much more natural stroke and have a better idea of how the ball was hit. It also lowers the center of gravity which helps the user get a much greater distance on their shots. The Hosel is a much overlooked component of the golf club, even though it shouldn’t be, knowing what its importance is.

    The Clubhead

    The clubhead as we all know is the section of the golf club that strikes the ball once a swing is taken. Each head has one face that hits the ball on the swing and gives the distance, loft, ball trajectory and many of the features that the ball goes through once it has been struck. Some putters and chippers have multiple striking faces which are identical and symmetrical for the extra finesse touches on those kinds of shots. Without a clubhead, the golf club itself would be nothing.

    The Ferrule

    The ferrule is the final component in a golf club and is simply the decorative trim ring which is found on the top of the hosel on many clubs that can be found today. Usually it is black (sometimes there are other colors which match the overall club) and gives your club that extra bit of good looks which may be just as important to your golfing equipment as the effectiveness of it. If you feel your clubs look great, then you will play great.

    Resources

    About the Author

    Marc Jenkins has been writing since 2008. His work has appeared in numerous online publications, and he is also co-host of the Double Play Sports Hour, a sports talk radio show on WBCR 1090AM in New York City. He studied English and mass communications at Virginia State University.

    Photo Credits

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