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Best Golf Clubs for Women

by Bill Herrfeldt

    Overview

    Women tend to hit the golf ball a shorter distance than do men. That's because women tend to have a slower swing speed. But some equipment changes can help women hit the ball longer. Before you buy your next set of golf clubs, find out what options are available, and how they can assist you with your game.

    Shafts

    There are two major types of golf shafts, steel and graphite. Steel shafts are less expensive, and the majority of women use them. However, they should consider a move to graphite. They cost a bit more, but they are lighter and can be swung more quickly. A woman who drives the ball about 175 yards or less should also pay close attention to the amount that the club's shaft bends when swung. Most women who hit their drives under that distance should choose ladies' shafts, the most bendable of the five grades of shafts.

    Club Heads

    In the past, woods were made of wood and irons were made of steel or a composite. Today, woods are made with heads of steel, titanium or a combination of the two. Those made of steel are heavier, so manufacturers are limited in how much they can expand the size and the sweet spot on the club head's face. However, club heads made of titanium are both lighter and more durable than those made of steel, and manufacturers can make them larger and easier to hit. The caveat is that they are quite a bit more expensive. But the extra cost could be worth it once you've added 10 or more yards to your shots.

    Different Problems, Different Clubs

    Before you buy your next set of golf clubs, think about the types of clubs you should have based on your particular game. For example, if you have a hard time hitting your long irons, consider replacing them with hybrid clubs, which are crosses between irons and woods. If the course you normally play calls for a variety of shots to cope with course hazards, consider adding a “gap wedge” or a "lob wedge” to your arsenal. And if you have problems getting your drives off the ground, consider a driver with more loft.

    References

    About the Author

    Bill Herrfeldt specializes in finance, sports and the needs of retiring people, and has been published in the national edition of "Erickson Tribune," the "Washington Post" and the "Arizona Republic." He graduated from the University of Louisville.

    Photo Credits

    • Ryan McVay/Digital Vision/Getty Images