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How to Hit a Golf Ball Straight Every Time

by Chris Moore

    This article is one of our editor's top picks this month.

    Hitting a golf ball straight is not easy. In fact, a "USA Today" article once listed hitting a long, straight tee shot as one of the most difficult tasks in sports. The most frustrating thing for most golfers is to see their shots slice or hook. The secret to hitting a straight shot lies in the mechanics of your swing. You might need to sacrifice a little power for accuracy while you focus on consistently hitting the ball straight.

    Step 1

    Use golf clubs with flex that works for your strength and shot distance. Men whose shot distance is below average are better off with women's or seniors' clubs. Golfers whose distance is greater than average should use stiff or extra-stiff shafts.

    Step 2

    Make sure you have a strong grip on the club. Move your hands to the right (for right-handers) or left (for left-handers) when gripping to increase strength. Don't increase pressure and make the grip too tight. Your wrist and forearm muscles should not be tense.

    Step 3

    Get in good position for the swing. Your legs should be shoulder-width apart, your knees slightly bent, and your legs and shoulders should be lined up parallel to your target. Even though your front shoulder will be lower than your back one, they should still be lined up like this.

    Step 4

    Position yourself correctly to the ball. The ball needs to be opposite your back foot's instep. Stand at a distance from the ball so that your club is grounded and will make solid contact.

    Step 5

    Increase your swing speed to reduce slice and increase distance. However, don't change speeds in mid-swing. You need a steady speed in both the backswing and downswing.

    Step 6

    Don't cock your wrist at the height of your backswing or you'll change the angle of your swing. Many amateurs make this mistake trying for more power, but it causes an errant drive.

    About the Author

    Chris Moore has been contributing to eHow since 2007 and is a member of the DFW Writers' Workshop. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Texas-Arlington.

    Photo Credits

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