How Many Golf Clubs Are Allowed in a Bag?

by Steve Silverman
    Tour players like Suzann Pettersen of Norway change their 14 clubs based on the type of course they're playing.

    Tour players like Suzann Pettersen of Norway change their 14 clubs based on the type of course they're playing.

    Michael Cohen/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images

    The rules of golf state that a golfer may have as many as 14 golf clubs in his bag for a given round. If you violate this rule, you are assessed a 2-stroke penalty for each hole on which you have too many clubs, up to a maximum of 4 penalty strokes. In match play, you lose the hole for a maximum penalty of two holes lost. This can be the difference in winning and losing an important match, so follow the rules and don't put any more than 14 clubs in your bag.

    Step 1

    Carry three woods in your bag. The driver, the 3-wood and the 5-wood are the three standard woods that most golfers use. Some golfers prefer a 7-wood and 9-wood instead of long irons or hybrids.

    Step 2

    Carry at least one hybrid in your bag. Even tour players now carry this versatile club. It typically replaced the long irons, such as the 3-iron or 4-iron.

    Step 3

    Put six irons and three wedges in your bag. Most golfers have a 4-iron, 5-iron, 6-iron, 7-iron, 8-iron and a 9-iron in their bags, as well as pitching, gap and sand wedges.

    Step 4

    Place a putter in your bag for your work on the greens.

    Step 5

    Add a lob wedge by removing a club you don't typically use.

    Tips

    • If you have a 5-wood in your bag but you never use it, take it out and replace it with another club that you like better.

    About the Author

    Steve Silverman is an award-winning writer, covering sports since 1980. Silverman authored The Minnesota Vikings: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Who's Better, Who's Best in Football -- The Top 60 Players of All-Time, among others, and placed in the Pro Football Writers of America awards three times. Silverman holds a Master of Science in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism.

    Photo Credits

    • Michael Cohen/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images