How to Personalize Golf Balls

by J.D. Chi
    Personalizing your golf ball can help keep track of it on the course.

    Personalizing your golf ball can help keep track of it on the course.

    Medioimages/Photodisc/Valueline/Getty Images

    When playing golf in a group it is important to make sure you always hit your own golf ball. To avoid any confusion, you may want to mark or personalize your golf ball.

    Items you will need

    • Golf balls
    • Mild soap and water mixture
    • Bucket
    • Rag
    • Permanent marker
    • Ball stamp

    Step 1

    Collect all the balls you wish to personalize. If they are not new balls, clean them in mild, soapy water to remove any dirt or debris. Dry with a soft towel.

    Step 2

    Select a spot on the ball and, if using permanent marker, write or draw your initials or design. Some golfers use a single letter or combination of letters while others prefer a combination of dots, a line or a drawing.

    Step 3

    If you use a ball stamp, hold the ball in one hand while rolling the stamp over the ball to ensure that the complete stamp is transferred. Stamps are usually pre-inked with permanent ink. Depending on the type of stamp, you may be able to insert the ball into the stamp and press down to make the image.

    Step 4

    Let the marker or ink dry. This usually takes only a few seconds, but touch the ink spot with your finger to ensure that the ink is dry and does not smudge.

    Tips

    • If personalizing by hand, select a design and be consistent so as not to confuse your ball with another player's.

    Warnings

    • If ink is not allowed to dry, personalization may smudge, creating a distraction during golfing.
    • Check with other players to make sure that you are not duplicating a design.

    About the Author

    J.D. Chi is a professional journalist who has covered sports for more than 20 years at newspapers all over the United States. She has covered major golf tournaments and the NFL as well as travel and health topics. Chi received her Bachelor of Arts in professional writing from Carnegie Mellon University and is working toward a master's degree in journalism.

    Photo Credits

    • Medioimages/Photodisc/Valueline/Getty Images