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How to Get PGA Certified

by M.L. Rose

    The Professional Golfers Association of America began its PGA Certified Professional Program (CPP) in 2004. This online education program is for PGA pros “who are committed to continuously enhancing their golf management skills,” according to PGA.com. The program offers courses in numerous career avenues, including instruction, general management, golf operations, turfgrass management and customer relations. You must be a PGA member before you may enroll in the program, which began upgrading to CPP 2.0 in early 2012.

    Step 1

    Log on to PGALinks.com.

    Step 2

    Read descriptions of the certifications and career paths to gain an overview of the program. PGA members may also speak with a PGA employment consultant to help decide which certification to choose. PGA senior editor Michael Abramowitz notes that the PGA employs regional consultants across the United States.

    Step 3

    Choose one of the four certification areas: golf operations, general management, player development or instruction.

    Step 4

    Register for online courses within your certification area. More than 2,000 courses are available, Abramowitz notes, and all of them may be accessed from the PGA’s Course Library. As of 2012, a PGA member may purchase 12 months of access to the complete course library for $350.

    Step 5

    Complete what the PGA terms a written “Capstone Report” that outlines the benefits you expect to receive from the certification process.

    Step 6

    Take and complete 14 required courses in your certification area plus six elective courses. If you’ve been a PGA member for less than eight years you must pass a proficiency exam for each course. PGA members for more than eight years have the option of completing a project presentation instead of taking the tests. The PGA estimates that it will take approximately 80 to 100 hours to complete the coursework and other requirements of CPP 2.0.

    Tips

    • According to the PGA, a certified head golf professional earns 31 percent more in wages than a non-certified head pro, while a PGA-certified general manager earns 27 percent more than a non-certified counterpart.

    References

    About the Author

    M.L. Rose has worked as a print and online journalist for more than 20 years. He has contributed to a variety of national and local publications, specializing in sports writing. Rose holds a B.A. in communications.