How to Remove Putter Grips

by Jim Thomas

    When golf club grip manufacturer Golf Pride surveyed a number golfers who replaced their grips, 66 percent reported they had lowered their scores by up to four strokes. As for putter grips, Golf Pride states, "Putter grips are the most touched, most used and most overlooked piece of equipment in the bag." If you can remove your own putter grips and save the old ones, you'll have options whenever you want to switch back to an old favorite.

    Items you will need

    • Spring-rod grip remover
    • Solvent such as odorless paint thinner in squeeze bottle
    • Bore cleaner

    Step 1

    Stand your putter upright with the grip on the ground, says Jack Waddell of The Sand Trap website. Waddell learned this relatively safe and simple method of removing putter grips from another clubmaker after Waddell experimented with other, more complicated methods. Waddell calls the "slip slide" method "ridiculously simple." It allows you to remove a putter grip with only a slight chance of damaging it.

    Step 2

    Insert the grip remover just under the lip of the grip. Squeeze solvent into the gap between the grip and the shaft.

    Step 3

    Hold the grip remover steady and twist the club to allow the tool to spiral down the shaft. Stop occasionally to squeeze in more solvent. The solvent weakens the adhesive tape on the grip, so you don't need to push down too hard on the grip remover. That lessens the chances of shoving it through the grip and ruining it..

    Step 4

    When the grip is free -- Waddell says you can feel it break loose -- hold the grip remover steady and twist the club to pull the shaft from the grip. If the grip comes up with tape residue still attached on the inside, use solvent and a bore cleaner to remove the remaining tape.

    Tips

    • This method works for all types of putter grips, says Waddell. For stiffer grips made from leather and cord, go slowly and patiently and use plenty of solvent when separating the old grip with the grip removal tool.

    Warnings

    • If you are not used to working with sharp tools and solvents, for your own safety it's probably best to leave grip removal to the pros.

    About the Author

    Jim Thomas has been a freelance writer since 1978. He wrote a book about professional golfers and has written magazine articles about sports, politics, legal issues, travel and business for national and Northwest publications. He received a Juris Doctor from Duke Law School and a Bachelor of Science in political science from Whitman College.