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How to Select a Golf Club Shaft

by Jackson Lewis

    The shaft is a critical component of the golf club. The shaft is used to transfer the energy of your swing to the golf ball. You should not pick a shaft solely based on the popularity of a brand name or on what type of shaft your old clubs had. By taking the time to pick a shaft to match your golf swing, you can ensure your clubs will help improve your overall game.

    Step 1

    Choose a graphite shaft if you do not generate a high swing speed. Steel or graphite shafts may be used by players who generate moderate swing speeds.

    Step 2

    Determine your golf shot trajectory by hitting a bucket of range balls with a middle iron. If the majority of your shots remain low to the ground, your shot has a low trajectory.

    Step 3

    Pick a bend point for the shaft based on the average trajectory you hit the golf ball.

    Step 4

    Select the appropriate shaft flex rating based on your average driver distance. If you normally hit the driver in excess of 275 yards, an extra stiff flex rating will be appropriate. Driver distances from 250 to 275 call for a stiff flex, 230 to 250 regular flex, 200 to 230 senior, and less than 200 yards a ladies' flex.

    Step 5

    Request to have your local pro shop measure the distance from your hand to the floor to determine if you need shafts that are longer or shorter than the standard length. The pro shop will have a fitting chart that is tailored to different shaft models.

    Step 6

    Hit a club with the shaft you are thinking about buying. Many golf shops have indoor practice facilities where you can test shafts and get real-time feedback on performance before making your purchase.

    Tips

    • High bend points in a shaft will help you hit the ball on a lower trajectory, while a low point will result in higher shots.
    • Amateur golfers commonly overestimate their average driver distance when choosing shaft flex, which can have a negative impact on their overall game.

    About the Author

    Based in Memphis, Jackson Lewis has been writing on technology-related material for 10 years with a recent emphasis on golf and other sports. He has been freelance writing for Demand Media since 2008. Lewis holds a Master of Science in computer science from the United States Naval Postgraduate School.

    Photo Credits

    • Michael Cohen/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images