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Where to Sell Used Golf Balls

by Kim Kleinle Google
    Lessen the cost of golf by recycling some old golf balls for profit.

    Lessen the cost of golf by recycling some old golf balls for profit.

    Medioimages/Photodisc/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Overview

    If you're a typical golfer, you have accumulated more used golf balls than you need. You can clean out your garage and make some extra money by finding a place to sell those balls. If you take the time to clean the balls and separate them by brand, type and quality, you can ask for a higher price on eBay or at flea markets. If you don't want to invest that much time, you can sell your golf balls in bulk, but your per-ball price will be lower.

    Practice Facilities

    Visit local driving ranges to find out which ones buy used balls. Although some upscale facilities buy only new practice balls, many driving ranges do not. These facilities are the best places to sell your used balls. Most facilities have a set price they pay for balls, anywhere from 5 to 15 cents per ball. Prices vary by location, but you're not going to get a better deal by trying to haggle. You'll have to check the facilities in your area to find the going rate. You don't need to separate your balls by brand, type or quality. The balls can have minor scrapes, but no cuts.

    Golf Courses

    Golf courses, just like practice facilities, may buy used golf balls for either their driving ranges or to resell as "experienced" golf balls in the pro shop. Public and municipal golf courses are the facilities most likely to buy used balls; private country clubs generally sell only new golf balls and buy new practice balls for their driving ranges. For balls headed for the driving range, the course will offer a set price (5 to 15 cents per ball) and they will buy in bulk, so you don't need to separate by brand, type or quality. Remove any balls that have cuts. Balls that can be resold in the pro shop should be like new (no scratches, scrapes or discoloring), and the pro will offer to pay about one-quarter the retail selling price.

    Flea Markets

    Set up a table at your local flea market. Clean and separate your golf balls by brand and type and package them by the dozen, using clear plastic bags or egg cartons. Premium brands are big sellers at flea markets. If the balls are in like-new condition, premium brands sell for about half the retail price, although you should check to see if you have any competition and price your golf balls accordingly. Drop the price for balls that are discolored or have scratches. Feel free to haggle with the buyer, especially if he is willing to buy several dozen.

    Websites

    An Internet search will reveal sites that buy used golf balls, but most of them require you to sell a minimum of several thousand balls. These sites include ILoveToGolf.com and OnlyGolfBalls.com. Another site, wbugb.com, has no minimum and bases its pricing on the average market prices for the brand of ball.

    On eBay, you can sell golf balls by the dozen or by the thousands. You can also sell in bulk, with all brands mixed or separated by brand and type. However you decide to sell them, eBay buyers want to know the quality of the balls, so you will have to rate them based on how much wear they have sustained. Note whether the balls are like new, mid-grade (with a scratch or two), or low-grade (scratches and yellowing). Remove any balls with cuts and throw them away; they are unusable to anyone.

    About the Author

    Kim Kleinle is a PGA/LPGA professional and a member of a select group certified in instruction by the Professional Golfers' Association. She began writing in 1980 after earning her degree. Her work has appeared online, in "Northeast Golfer" and in newspapers, including the "Scranton Times." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Point Park University, Pittsburgh.

    Photo Credits

    • Medioimages/Photodisc/Photodisc/Getty Images