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How to Slow Your Golf Swing Down

by Timothy Bodamer

    Slowing your golf swing down may provide more control and your ability to get more distance in your golf game. By applying techniques with your backswing, downswing and follow through, you may lower your scores and improve your handicap. Utilizing all parts of your body, including your hands, wrists and arms, may slow your body to work in concert to attain your golf and a more controlled shot.

    Items you will need

    Step 1

    Practice slowing your swing. Go in your backyard and mark a spot on the ground the size of a baseball home plate. Step off 40 feet from that spot. Take a softball and toss the ball underhand the throw to the "plate" area. Repeat four times with a high arch and a smooth toss. Take a golf club in one hand and take a golf swing similar to the tempo you did with the softball toss. Repeat two or three times. Use two hands on the club and repeat the swing step. This is a drill to help you mentally learn how to slow your swing.

    Step 2

    Swing half speed during a round of golf. Add an extra club to your swing to compensate for a slower, less powerful shot. By swinging half speed you're likely to hit the ball straighter while lessening the potential for spin on the ball because of the lower power. Hitting at half speed will also help you to locate your ball and keep it in play, saving you shots in your round.

    Step 3

    Choose the right club. Hitting the ball harder doesn't mean added distance, but may cause you to lose balance. Use an extra club, as mentioned in Step 2, to help you add distance without overcompensating in your swing. Using an extra club provides more distance and allows you to slow your swing.

    Step 4

    Position your arms correctly. Position your elbow at the top of your backswing to ensure an accurate swing. Your arms should be positioned like a waiter caring a drink platter. The "waiter's arm" should be identical for left and right arms. By doing this, your club face will be on the correct swing plane. Utilizing good mechanics will slow down your tempo and focus on a solid golf shot.

    About the Author

    Tim Bodamer is a freelance writer based in Seminole, Florida. He attended Edinboro Univerity of Pennsylvania where he studied journalism. He has 15 years of writing experience and specializes in sports, business and general interest topics.

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