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How Do I Swing Hybrid Irons?

by Jackson Lewis
    Even touring pros find that a rescue hybrid is the right club for a special situation.

    Even touring pros find that a rescue hybrid is the right club for a special situation.

    Stuart Franklin/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images

    The two through five iron have generally proved to be difficult clubs for the amateur to strike consistently well, but merely switching to a wood of a similar distance has not proved a sufficient replacement. Hybrid golf clubs look like a wood but are designed to be swung similar to an iron and offer a greater forgiveness than the traditional iron or fairway wood of similar loft.

    Step 1

    Stand in front of the golf ball and place the ball approximately 1-2 inches closer to the front foot in your stance than you would with a fairway wood.

    Step 2

    Grip the club lightly in the stance while playing the ball forward. Similar to hitting other golf shots, if your grip changes as a result of increased grip pressure, your shot will be inaccurate or lack the appropriate range.

    Step 3

    Swing the hybrid club back in a controlled fashion, paying particular attention to not rush this part of the golf swing as compared to hitting an iron or fairway wood. If you need to mentally picture the hybrid backswing, it should mimic the swing you use for the golf irons.

    Step 4

    Hit the golf ball on a downward angle with the sweeping motion you may use with a fairway wood. The divot with a hybrid golf club should be minimal, however. If you notice the club is making a large divot, the downward swing may be at too great of an angle.

    Step 5

    Follow through on the swing after connecting with the golf ball. The ending location of your hands should be the same location that you find yourself when hitting the 6 or 7 iron.

    Step 6

    Practice hitting your hybrid clubs until they become second nature for you to use on the course. A common mistake made by amateurs when switching to the hybrid golf club is not devoting enough time to practicing with their new club before using it on the golf course.

    About the Author

    Based in Memphis, Jackson Lewis has been writing on technology-related material for 10 years with a recent emphasis on golf and other sports. He has been freelance writing for Demand Media since 2008. Lewis holds a Master of Science in computer science from the United States Naval Postgraduate School.

    Photo Credits

    • Stuart Franklin/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images