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Techniques to Not Slice a Golf Ball Off the Tee

by Bryan Rose
    Stand with your feet straight – not pointed away from the slice – and place the ball in the middle of your stance.

    Stand with your feet straight – not pointed away from the slice – and place the ball in the middle of your stance.

    George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images

    It is the most common mistake among amateur golfers. You hit a shot off the tee only to see it take an abrupt turn in mid air and slice off into the woods. But with a few simple changes to your stance and swing, you can spend more time golfing and less time finding your ball in the woods.

    Items you will need

    Step 1

    After teeing up the ball, make sure you align your feet properly. Many people think that if they turn their stance away from the slice, it will correct. This will actually worsen the slice. What you should do is stand with your feet straight. To make sure you are aligned properly, lay your golf club touching your toes. The club should point straight at the target.

    Step 2

    Ball placement is also key to hitting a straight golf shot. Place the ball in the middle of your stance so that it is equal distance from the front foot and the back foot. Moving the ball more to either the front or the back of your stance can also cause you not to hit the ball straight.

    Step 3

    For most people, the back arm is the key to why they slice the ball. The back arm is the arm furthest away from the hole. When you bring the club back to start the swing, make sure your back elbow keeps contact with your side as long as possible. It is okay to let elbow come off the side at the top of the back swing.

    Step 4

    As you bring the club forward, make sure you return your elbow back into your side. Think of driving your elbow into your side. Many people slice because they let their elbows slide inside and thus opening up the club head. By keeping your elbow into your side, you can force your arms to "turnover" and hit the ball flush with the club head.

    Step 5

    As you bring the club through, be sure to keep your front shoulder straight or facing toward the hole. This can be accomplished by thinking of driving your shoulder down into the ground as you bring the club forward.

    Step 6

    On your follow through, keep your head down until your back arm and shoulder force it to come around. This will keep you down on the ball and keep you from pulling it. When you finish, you should be in an ideal position to watch the ball in flight.

    Tips

    • If you are having trouble seeing the ball fly after you hit your drive, go back to step 5 as this may mean you are pulling your shoulders and opening up on your drive. This will also cause you to slice.
    • When changing your golf swing, it is important to practice your new swing over and over. It takes time to develop muscle memory where your body is used to the new swing and you can do it with less concentration.

    Resources

    About the Author

    Bryan Rose is an experienced journalist and web writer, spending nearly 12 years in the publishing industry. Rose works for a variety of Demand Studios websites, writing mostly for ehow.com and Golflink.com. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in History degree from the University of Wisconsin.

    Photo Credits

    • George Doyle/Stockbyte/Getty Images